Friday, 10 October 2014

Test the speed of your Internet connection

Calculate the data rate for transmission and reception of your Internet connection using reliable and free testing Here is an a solid Ptcl speed test.

Initially, close all browser windows, software peer to peer and other software that might be in the process of exchanging data over the Internet.

After a couple of tests, the service tells you the rates on reception (download) and transmit (upload) your internet connection.

How to interpret the results of the speed test?
The test is based on an application in Flash that will make measurements on your internet connection. This test works with all types of connections: ADSL, ADSL2 +, cable, optic fiber or low flow. Initially, it will measure the response time (commonly called "ping"). The "ping" indicates the time required for a small data packet to make a round trip between your computer and our server speed test. The higher the result, the lower your connection is responsive. For multiplayer online games, it is recommended to have less than 60 ms ping. ADSL or ADSL2 + generally provides a ping between 30 and 80 ms.

Then, the test will take a measurement of your speed (or bandwidth) edge (e), that is to say, the amount of data you can receive in a second. For this, the application will download a data file and calculating the rate of receipt thereof. The measurement is, the higher the speed of your connection. Here flows down possible depending on the type of Internet connection (ADSL, ADSL2 +, cable, optic fiber). 1 Mbps = 1000 kbps
Finally, the test will take a measurement of your speed (or bandwidth) amount (e), that is to say, the amount of data you can send per second. For this, the application will download a data file and calculating the transmission speed thereof. The measurement is, the higher the speed of your connection. Here are the possible flow amount depending on the type of Internet connection (ADSL, ADSL2 +, cable, optic fiber). 1
Mbps = 1000 kbps

IP debit or ATM debit card?
The flow rate measured by the test is the actual throughput of your connection, which is the IP flow.
The ATM flow is the flow rate required for the transmission of data. An example: for transmitting an image, your connection will transmit the pixels of the image but will also generate verification codes and in case of transmission error, it will send some packages. The amount of data transferred is more important than the sheer size of the image. On average, for ADSL or ADSL2 +, the user data represent 80% of the total data to be transferred, the remainder being devoted to monitoring and correcting errors 20%. Thus, for a bandwidth of 20 Mbps ATM, it has a bandwidth of about 16 Mbps IP, standard 4 Mbps is used for data control unit.

To sum up:
-The ATM flow is the total flow rate required for the transmission of data.
-The IP flow is the transmission rate of the user data.

Small reminder of the units used
The "bits":
-The flow rates are expressed in "bps" because the useful information transmitted is binary, it is made "1" and "0". A "bit" is "1" or "0".
The 'byte'
-A "byte" is a set of eight consecutive "bits". 1 byte = 8 bits.

Multiple:
-Traditionally, when applied to the bytes or bits, the "kilo" prefixes "mega"
-"Giga", etc., are not a multiple of 1000, but a multiple of 2 10 = 1 024 However, this tradition violates the standards for other units, including the bit. A new standard has been created to record multiples of 2 10 = 1024: the "kibi", "MEBI", "gibi" etc.
-It would normally be called connections "M├ębibits 20" per second for ADSL2 + and not "20 megabits" per second.